Lizard Log 22/8/14 – 25/8/14

Day 22 23/8/14

We got moving early today to take advantage of the high tide. The wind was really strong today. We did a dive at horseshoe but got knocked around a lot there. We were copping swell from 2 different angles. Our transect setup kept falling apart. It took us 45 minutes to run 1 transect. Previously, we managed to get three transects in about an hour at this site.

Our second dive was much nicer. We dived the reef between Bird Island and South Island. It was still blowing a gale on the surface, but underwater was fine. We managed a few more transects and then called it a day.

It was BBQ night tonight. We met a few more of the tradies working on the resort and had a good catch up with some of the other researchers here.

Day 23 24/8/14

Did a couple of good dives today. The wind was stronger again than yesterday so we tried to target a slightly deeper reef in order to avoid the surface swell. By deeper, I mean 4 m. We did our first dive on a bommie between Bird and South Island. There wasn’t a lot of acroporid coral there, but we got enough for a couple of transects. The dive itself was quite nice. I saw the biggest sweet lip I’ve ever seen! The photo doesn’t really do it justice.

Big sweet lip

Big sweet lip

We did our second dive on the reef adjacent to the bommie. There was more acroporid growth, but the site had been hit pretty hard by the cyclone. My partner, Kylie, found a couple of beautiful little pipefish.

pipehorses

pipehorses

In the afternoon, we took a couple of the guys working with the Australian Museum up to Mermaid Cove.  The ride up was a bit bumpy but the cove itself was nice and protected. The two guys went off to collect gastropods while Kylie and I went for a snorkel. There was a lot of damage from the cyclone there. Some stretches of reef were just bare rubble with the odd clam poking through. We did find a big Porites bommie which was packed with tropical rock lobsters and there is still plenty of fish life around. Just not many gobies 😦

Rubble

Rubble

Tropical rock lobster

Tropical rock lobster

Looking for gastropods

Looking for gastropods

Day 24 25/8/14

The wind was crazy this morning! We actually decided to head back to the Clam Gardens for our dives today because the conditions in the lagoon were atrocious. As we rounded Osprey Islet, the wind, which funnels through the little valley where the airstrip is located, hit us hard. There was so much spray that I had to stop the boat to get a sense of where I was headed and put my mask on for the rest of the trip.

At the Clam Gardens, the wind was still blowing hard, but it is so close to shore that the wind doesn’t have enough distance (fetch) to stir up much of a swell. We did our two dives there, but were stretched pretty hard to find enough Acroporid corals. At least we weren’t getting pummelled underwater, but the trip back kind of made up for it! The boat was almost airborne a couple of times. I was on and off the throttle most of the way back. I’d go as far as saying that it was probably the worst conditions I’ve seen at Lizard. I’m sure it gets worse, but I’m yet to experience that joy.

In the afternoon, I took the two Australian Museum guys up to Watson’s to look for more gastropods. One of the station volunteers also decided to join us. She’d heard that there were octopus in Watson’s Bay and really wanted to see one.  The wind had thankfully died down a bit by the time we departed so we had a bumpy, but not uncomfortable ride up there. I decided to stay dry (although I got soaked on the drive up there!) and go for a walk. I decided to have a look along the Pandanus Track so I strapped on the hiking boots and set off. The track runs behind the dunes to a little paperbark swamp. It wasn’t a massive walk, but it nice to be out of the wind for a little bit.

The trusty old hiking boots

The trusty old hiking boots

Unfortunately, no one else had much success this afternoon, but everyone was happy. The boys only found a handful of gastropods, most of which they’d already collected and there were no octopus sightings. So we headed back for a warm shower. But then there was no hot water because it’s a solar system and it’s been overcast all day. The first world problems just keep on coming!

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