GobyPro issue 2

Welcome to the second edition of Gobypro!

It’s been quite a while since the previous post of GobyPro and we’ve been out in the field collecting more photos.

As promised in the last issue of GobyPro, Oranges are up first. We called these guys ‘Oranges’ because their species name is citrinus, which kind of sounds like citrus. G. citrinus is found mostly in big bunches of staghorn corals like A. intermedia. We usually saw them in large groups with two dominant breeders. These are the giants of the Gobiodon world, reaching sizes of up to 6.5 cm! Despite their massive size they were extremely difficult to capture as they would retreat right down into the coral. I really want to capture a few groups of these ones to see if they have a distinct size based hierarchy, but no luck so far. While I was diving in Indonesia recently, we found a group of G. citrinus which were black in colour.

G. citrinus

G. citrinus

G. citrinus black variant

G. citrinus black variant

Next we have the lemons, G. okinawae. These gobies are a very distinct bright yellow – hence the nickname “lemons”. We also called them lemons because we often found them living with a G. citrinus colony, forming a pretty little underwater orchid. Unlike most other species of Gobiodon, the lemons are the only species in this genus which like to hang out at the branch tips of the corals and often hover above and even move between corals. We found individuals ranging from 1.0 cm to 3.5 cm.

G. okinawae

G. okinawae

Goby Trivia

Some species have a high hypoxia tolerance and air breathing ability, meaning that they can stay in their corals even if the coral becomes exposed at extreme low tides.

Nilsson et al. 2004. Coward or braveheart: extreme habitat fidelity through hypoxia tolerance in a coral-dwelling goby

We saw this incredible ability on the last field trip during a king tide.

A G. erythrospilus, high and dry

A G. erythrospilus, high and dry

In the next issue of GobyPro:

An unidentified species of goby that we found on our last field trip.

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